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Wind-up Bird Chronicle
Haruki Murakami

Wind-up Bird Chronicle

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SUMMARY
In 1978, Haruki Murakami was 29 and running a jazz bar in downtown Tokyo. One April day, the impulse to write a novel came to him suddenly while watching a baseball game. That first novel, Hear the Wind Sing, won a new writers¿ award and was published the following year. More followed, including A Wild Sheep Chase and Hard-Boiled Wonderland and the End of the World, but it was Norwegian Wood, published in 1987, which turned Murakami from a writer into a phenomenon. His books became bestsellers, were translated into many languages, including English, and the door was thrown wide open to Murakami¿s unique and addictive fictional universe. Murakami writes with admirable discipline, producing ten pages a day, after which he runs ten kilometres (he began long-distance running in 1982 and has participated in numerous marathons and races), works on translations, and then reads, listens to records and cooks. His passions colour his non-fiction output, from What I Talk About When I Talk About Running to Absolutely On Music, and they also seep into his novels and short stories, providing quotidian moments in his otherwise freewheeling flights of imaginative inquiry. In works such as The Wind-Up Bird Chronicle, 1Q84 and Men Without Women, his distinctive blend of the mysterious and the everyday, of melancholy and humour, continues to enchant readers, ensuring Murakami¿s place as one of the world¿s most acclaimed and well-loved writers.
AUTHOR BIO
In 1978, Haruki Murakami was 29 and running a jazz bar in downtown Tokyo. One April day, the impulse to write a novel came to him suddenly while watching a baseball game. That first novel, Hear the Wind Sing, won a new writers' award and was published the following year. More followed, including A Wild Sheep Chase and Hard-Boiled Wonderland and the End of the World, but it was Norwegian Wood, published in 1987, which turned Murakami from a writer into a phenomenon. His books became bestsellers, were translated into many languages, including English, and the door was thrown wide open to Murakami's unique and addictive fictional universe. Murakami writes with admirable discipline, producing ten pages a day, after which he runs ten kilometres (he began long-distance running in 1982 and has participated in numerous marathons and races), works on translations, and then reads, listens to records and cooks. His passions colour his non-fiction output, from What I Talk About When I Talk About Running to Absolutely On Music, and they also seep into his novels and short stories, providing quotidian moments in his otherwise freewheeling flights of imaginative inquiry. In works such as The Wind-Up Bird Chronicle, 1Q84 and Men Without Women, his distinctive blend of the mysterious and the everyday, of melancholy and humour, continues to enchant readers, ensuring Murakami's place as one of the world's most acclaimed and well-loved writers.

BOOK DETAILS

EDITION
01.09.2003
TYPE
Paperback
ISBN
9780099448792
LANGUAGE
English
PAGES
609
KEYWORDS
kazoo ishiguro yukio mishima life for sale strange weather in tokyo hiromi kawakami, han kang the vegetarian jay rubin memory police yoko ogawa romance love longing, japanese novels writers authors asian literature literary fiction surrealism, emptiness ikagi before the coffee gets cold toshikazu kawaguchi, paul auster prizewinning prizewinners nazi war metaphors facism jazz rape of nanking, makioka sisters junichiro tanizaki travelling cat chronicles hiro arikawa clou, thousand autumns of jacob de zoet pachinko min jin lee, nobel prize winners cats animals satire humour comedy funny books jazz music, norwegian wood men without women killing commandatore convenience store woman sayaka murata
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